Sundays in January, February & March 2020

Sundays in January, February & March 2020
Robert Draper

In Sacrosanctum Concilium, the Constitution on the Sacred Liturgy, the Fathers of Vatican II decreed that: ‘The treasures of the Bible are to be opened up more lavishly, so that a richer fare may be provided for the faithful at the table of God’s word’. (SC 51) This lavish feast of the Word of God at the celebration of the Eucharist is designed to nourish and inspire the faithful. The following reflections on the Sunday readings for the next three months are an attempt to help readers and listeners to savour and to ponder the selected passages, so as to be drawn ever closer to the source of that nourishment. Most of the Gospel readings given to us in ordinary time over the next two months from Matthew belong to what we call the Sermon on the Mount. In Matthew this has a role which is comparable to the reception of the Law by Moses on Mount Sinai in the book of Exodus. Jesus is the new Moses, the new lawgiver – ‘you have heard it said ... but I say to you’ (5.21; 5.27; 5.31 etc.) Those who heard Matthew’s account of Jesus’ teaching in the early Church, and those who hear these texts today, will continue to be struck by its uncompromising nature, that will always be a challenge to those who seek to be disciples.

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Breaking the Word - Sundays

In the constitution on the Sacred Liturgy, the Fathers of Vatican II decreed that: ‘The treasures of the Bible are to be opened up more lavishly so that a richer fare may be provided for the faithful at the table of God’s word’. (SC.52) The lavish feast of Sacred Scripture at the celebration of the Eucharist is designed to nourish and inspire the faithful. The following reflections on the Sunday readings for the next two months are an attempt to help readers and listeners to both savour and  ponder the selected passages so as to be drawn ever closer to the source of that nourishment. The author is a parish priest in Dorset and Vicar General of the Diocese of Plymouth.